Join us for Youth Ministry Revival!

This week’s blog is by Shannon Harper, CER Youth and Young Adult Ministries Specialist.

Answering the Call of Love Youth Ministry Revival 19, March 1-3, 2019Do you have youth in your congregation who are yearning for connection with other UU youth? Who are interested in exploring spiritual practices that help us survive and thrive in the world? Who would like to learn more about justice issues from activists and organizers in the field?

We’re excited to announce registration for Youth Ministry Revival 2019: Answering the Call of Love in Bethesda, MD March 1-3 is now open!

Youth Ministry Revivals, or YMRs, are national, weekend-long conferences open to Sr High youth in grades 9-12 as well as young adults and adults who support youth ministry in congregations. We had our first YMR in 2016 in Portland, OR and the second in 2017 in Chicago, IL. For more information about YMRs see the UUA webpage.

Who Should Attend YMR2019?

YMRs are open to any UU Youth in the US and Canada. We encourage congregations to send teams of youth and adults; people who will be interested and supported in bringing back their ideas and learnings to your congregation. Adult sponsors (25 and over) are expected to participate in the conference, so it’s important to choose adults who are truly interested in supporting youth and willing to join in. Registration is also open to YAs (graduated from High School and between the ages of 18 and 25), especially those with leadership experience and willing to help out as staff (see sleeping arrangements below). We are happy to accommodate different physical and social needs, just let us know what they are.

What Are the Sleeping Arrangements?

Regardless of whether your congregation sends a group or just one, all youth must have an adult (over 25) sponsor who sleeps in the same place as the youth. Our expectation is that most attendees will sleep at the church. However we understand that this is might not be ideal for certain people. We have blocked a number of discounted rooms at the Bethesda Marriott for $89 a night, available until Feb 2. To make a reservation visit their website. Remember that youth must sleep in the same place with their adult sponsor, so if your sponsor is staying at the hotel, the youth must stay there as well. YAs under the age of 25 must make their own arrangements to sleep offsite. For questions about accommodations please contact Amy Kent at [email protected] .

Is there an Approval Process to Attend?

In accordance with Central East’s safety policy everyone attending YMR2019 must be approved by a staff member or designated leader in their congregation (ideally their Religious Educator or Minister). For people who reside outside of CER the registration form will have a way to indicate who we should contact for a reference. That person will be sent an automated email with instructions for approving the registrant. If you have any questions about the registration or approval process please contact Evin Carvill-Ziemer at [email protected] .

Program Details to Come!

The Central East Region is excited to host YMR2019! We’re planning with Youth and YA leaders, community partners, local musicians, UUA and congregation staff to bring you a dynamic and inspiring event.  Some of the things attendees can expect to experience: dynamic, interactive worship; creative expression through visual arts, spoken word music and song; workshops with community organizers and activists; community circles for building deeper connections and relationships; identity circles for sharing and exploration; spiritual practices to take back with you. As we confirm our schedule and guests we’ll update our website so please keep checking back. For questions about the program or schedule please contact Shannon Harper at [email protected].

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Ysaye Barnwell 2019 Summer Institute Theme Speaker

Dr. Ysaye Barnwell
Dr. Ysaye Barnwell

The planning committee for the Central East Region Summer Institute (formerly the OMD Summer Institute) is very pleased to announce that Dr. Ysaye Barnwell will be the theme speaker for Summer Institute 2019, July 7-13 at Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH.

The topic of her theme speaker will be Building a Vocal Community, which is an award winning workshop she has presented around the world. There is an awesome power in the human voice and when uncommon voices are blended for the common good, they become a ‘vocal community’ at its best. Masterfully led by Dr. Ysaÿe M. Barnwell, singers and non-singers alike will share the common experience of learning in the oral tradition and singing rhythms, chants, traditional songs from Africa and the Diaspora, and a variety of songs from African American culture including spirituals, ring shouts, hymns, gospels, and songs from the Civil Rights Movement. The historical, social and political context will provided as an introduction to the songs. Through out this experience, the group will explore from an African American world view, the values imbedded in the music, the role of cultural and spiritual traditions and rituals, ways in which leadership emerges and can be shared by and among community members, the nature of cultural responses to and influences on political and social struggle, and finally the significance of a shared communal experience in ones’ personal life. All that is required is a willingness to sing.

Dr. Ysaye M. Barnwell a native New Yorker now living in Washington, DC is the only child and perfect blend of her mother, a registered nurse and her father, a classical violinist. Dr. Barnwell studied violin for 15 years beginning at age 2 ½, and majored in music through high school. With this background, she went on to earn the Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in Speech Pathology (SUNY, Geneseo, 1967, 1968), Doctor of Philosophy in Speech Pathology (University of Pittsburgh, 1975), and the Master of Science in Public Health (Howard University, 1981). In 1998, Dr. Barnwell was awarded the Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree by her alma mater, SUNY Geneseo. She recently received the Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from the Meadville Lombard Theological Seminary in Chicago, IL (2009) and the Virginia Theological Seminary (2011); and in 2012, all members of Sweet Honey In the Rock, were awarded the Honorary Doctor of Letters Degree from Chicago Theological Seminary (2012).

Dr. Barnwell appears as a vocalist and/or instrumentalist on more than thirty recordings with Sweet Honey In The Rock as well as other artists. She has, for the past thirty years spent much of her time off stage working as a master teacher and choral clinician in African American cultural performance. Her workshop “Building a Vocal Community®: Singing in the African American Tradition” has during the past twenty-eight years, been conducted on three continents, making her work in the field a significant source of inspiration for both singers and non-singers, a model of pedagogy for educators, and cultural activists and historians. Dr. Barnwell has been a commissioned composer on numerous choral, film, video, dance and theatrical projects including Sesame Street, Dance Alloy of Pittsburgh, David Rousseve’s Reality Dance Company, The New Spirituals Project, GALA Festival Choruses, MUSE: Cincinnati’s Women’s Chorus, The Steel Festival: Art of an Industry (Bethlehem, PA), The King’s Singers in England.

Four axioms have proven significant in Barnwell’s life. To whom much is given, much is required. As one door closes, another door opens. Everything matters. Say Yes!

You can learn more about Summer Institute at their website. You can learn more about Dr. Ysaye Barnwell at her website.

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Serving with Mutuality

Photo by Aria Nadii

My spouse and I are planning out a permaculture garden in the backyard of our new house. We don’t know much about permaculture yet, but we are learning. We are starting with the soil. The yard had been covered with concrete, so we are starting from scratch. We hauled several truckloads of leaf and tree mulch from the city and are watching it compost in place over the summer. There are a few volunteer pumpkins from discarded Halloween pumpkins that were mixed in the mulch, and we threw a few seeds in to see if they would sprout, but this is really a time for the organic material to decompose and welcome microbes and other creatures to make their home in our new garden. We are also augmenting the soil with our household compost, and we plan to plant a temporary groundcover in the fall that can be worked into the soil. Eventually, we will find plants, bushes and trees that allow for the soil to replenish itself while feeding the flora, thus the name permaculture.

Modern agriculture works from a different philosophy. We plant and harvest until the natural nutrients in the soil are exhausted. Then we may add fertilizer to the soil as a replacement for the natural nutrients. Or we may rotate the crops so that different nutrients are used. Or we may plant a temporary ground cover to plow into the soil and let the ground lie fallow while the soil absorbs the nutrients of the organic matter.

Even though most of us live far from our agrarian roots, I think they still have lessons to teach us.

In my work with congregational leaders I see some leaders who work hard in service of the church, and become burned out—sometimes to the point that they no longer want to be part of the church community. Some of these leaders might renew themselves with a volunteer sabbatical, but more often they have learned to associate church with a depletion of their time and energy.

But I also see other leaders who also work just as hard in service of the church, but don’t burn out. What is the difference? The leaders who are able to sustain hard work are in a mutual life-giving relationship with their faith community. These leaders find ways (or—better yet—the church leadership creates systems) so that the work is meaningful and impactful, and leaders’ hearts and spirits are fed and nurtured. The depth of planning worship, or participating in a small group is an important complement to the work of taking minutes or tracking the budget.

As we remind ourselves in our seventh principle, we are interconnected and interdependent in mutuality. May we create faith communities that live into that ideal.

Rev. Renee Ruchotzke
Congregational Life Staff, Central East Region

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