UU Amherst Dedicates Free Food Pantry

Two years ago, UU Church of Amherst, NY member Maria Ceraulo read a story online about a “Little Free Food Pantry” and thought, “Huh, we should do this,” and began floating the idea to her congregation. The congregation applied for and received a very generous grant from the Network of Religious Communities of Greater Buffalo. They also found a partner to help operate the pantry, Congregation Havurah, who shares space with the UU congregation.

On Sunday, September 30, the pantry was opened. Members of all ages came early to stock the panty and ready it for the blessing after the service. The congregations primary contact, the Rev. Renee Ruchotzke co-led the service with the congregation’s settled minister, the Rev. Michelle Buhite.  After the service the congregation gathered underneath the portico where the new pantry is accessible to all. Maria and other leaders instrumental in the project participated in the grand opening, and Rev. Michelle gave the blessing. The grand opening and dedication was covered by local media, including on the local news channel. https://www.wgrz.com/article/news/local/new-food-pantry-opens-in-williamsville/71-599502862

Food Pantry Dedication by Rev. Michelle Buhite.

Today we begin a new thing.
Today we lift up a new way to embody our mission
to foster more compassion and justice in the world,
by committing ourselves to feed the hungry in our community.

May those who have, share from their abundance.
May those who need, find nourishment for body and soul.
And may we recognize that we are all givers and receivers –
all in need of the grace of human kindness
and a word of hope and encouragement.

May it be so.

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Annual Seaway Gathering

The annual Seaway Gathering and Gould Lecture was held on April 13-14, 2018 at the First UU Society of Syracuse, NY.

The Gould Discourse titled UU Sniffing Salts was presented by Sheila Schuh and the keynote presentation titled You Can’t Spell Church without J-O-Y was presented by Rev. Megan Foley. Workshops on a variety of topics including Restorative Practices 101, Helping Small Congregations Connect with the Next Church-Going Generation, Sticky Membership and Understanding Micro-Aggressions were offered. The graduating youth from the Upstate New York Youth were bridged during the closing worship service.

For those of you who who could not make the event, or who want a refresher on what happened, we offer video of the Gould Lecture and the Keynote Presentation and Megan Foley’s workshop Helping Smaller Congregations Connect with the Next Church-Going Generation. We also thank Til Fritzshing from the Watertown NY congregation who took photos and shared them with us, a few are posted below.

Bridging Youth at Seaway Gathering
Networking sessions at the Seaway Gathering
Networking Sessions at Seaway Gathering

 

 

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Celebrating 200 Years of Universalism in Western New York

Many churches celebrate important anniversaries, but it’s rare that congregational historians take a wider view. But when Bill Parke, the Church Historian of the UU Church of Buffalo noted this anniversary, he researched the topic and came up with this lovely display and story.

2016 is a bicentennial year for our faith! All the way back in 1816, The Reverend Stephen R. Smith arrived here and began a preaching circuit, bringing a new religion — Universalism — to Buffalo and Western New York.

***

Take a moment, and teleport yourself back in me and imagine life in June, 1816 when 27-year old Mr. Smith arrived:

At this me, except on the great lateral roads from Genesee River and along the shore of Lake Erie, the settlements were comparatively few – and sometimes “far between.” There every thing but the eternal woods and waters, was new. –Almost every family still occupied its primitive log cabin–the roads were but cart-paths in the interminable forest–the streams were in most instances without bridges, and the soil deep enough to render every traveled way almost impassable. And yet, it was among these settlements, that the preacher of Universalism was to find hearers, and friends, and hope to raise up congregations!

 

Just a few years earlier, the village of Buffalo was overrun by British soldiers during the War of 1812. Nearly all its buildings burned. Recovery was slow. And just two Universalist societies existed in New York west of the Genesee River. But even if there weren’t churches, there were early believers: Benjamin Caryl, who helped found one of the village’s first businesses, a bank, was one. He had a house in Williamsville and invited Mr. Smith to stay with him and begin preaching. As a result, Universalism arrived in our land. Here is Mr. Smith’s own account:

On the 24th of June of this year (1816), a Masonic celebration in the then village of Buffalo, furnished a convient (sic) opportunity for the introduction of Universal Salvation into that place. The appointment was accordingly made; and at 5 o’clock, P.M. the same building and the same seats were occupied for the service, that had been fitted up for the festival. It was a new Barn, attached to one of the Taverns— and though its accommodations would now be thought rather humble, they were the best which the place afforded, and were duly appreciated by the citizens. A respectable auditory attended, and gave very patient and candid hearing to a discourse from the 6th ver. of 126th Psalm—“He that goeth forth and weepeth bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him.”

Mr. Smith found receptive audiences for his message and established a preaching circuit which, he wrote,

in its windings to and from the vicinity of Buffalo, embraced about two hundred and y miles. And from this time, during most of the year, this distance was very regularly traveled every four weeks. The number of discourses usually delivered in making the circuit, varied from twenty to thirty-two—that is, from five to eight per week.

What about in winter? After all, today many Buffalonians shy away from winter weather; but not the circuit riding preachers of yesteryear. Roads would be frozen and not muddy, making travel easier. In January, 1817, Mr. Smith wrote from Buffalo to his parents, “I have preached twenty-one times in twenty days.”

In most localities, Universalism was wholly unknown. Mr. Smith was “the pioneer, the first herald of salvation, within their borders.” Mr. Smith himself wrote, “Doors are opened everywhere, and the walls of Zion are, by the divine blessing, laid in fair colors.”

Having laid a foundation of faith, in 1817 Mr. Smith departed. Ensuing years brought ebbs and flows to Universalist fortunes here. Many open-minded Bu alonians were recep ve, but the Universalist message contrasted sharply with Christian beliefs of the time, and general acceptance was hard-won. Thank goodness for stalwarts like Benjamin Caryl. He helped establish the first permanent Universalist Church in Buffalo, by organizing the first board of trustees, signing a certificate of organization to form a congregation on December 6, 1831, and seeing a church built on Washington Street. Shortly after it was dedicated in August, 1833, Mr. Caryl wrote to Mr. Smith: “Br. Smith: We have got, as you have heard, a beautiful house dedicated to the worship of Almighty God, but unfortunately, we are destitute of a minister…” However, Mr. Smith could not be persuaded to return. Finally, in a turn of events presaged in words spoken by Mr. Smith in his first service in Buffalo in 1816 — “He that goeth forth and weepeth bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him” — Mr. Smith did return to Buffalo, commencing a ministry on the 1st day of May, 1843 and remaining in the pulpit for six years. The city was booming, the church “was highly prosperous and, above all, there was aboard in the place and neighborhood a spirit of deep religious inquiry.”

In time, however, Mr. Smith’s exertions over the decades took their toll. He preached his last sermon in the Buffalo church in 1849. In declining health, he was forced to give up his beloved pulpit. Then, one Sunday in February, 1850, the end arrived. And in fitting fashion, Mr. Smith connected with his faith — and our church — on his last day: “When the bells rang for church in the morning, he listened to them with deep interest, and finally selected that of the Universalist church from among the rest, and appeared to listen to it with unusual pleasure.” At the end of the day, “— in calmness, in peace, in purity, — closed the earthly career of one of the best of husbands, one of the best of fathers, one of the purest and most upright and exemplary of men, and one of the most eminent and faithful of the disciples of Christ and servants of God.”

Bill Parke, Church Historian
November 4, 2016

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Western New York Cluster Activates Social Justice

Participants On Saturday, April 23, close to fifty Unitarian Universalists from congregations in Western New York gathered for a social justice summit at the UU Church of Buffalo. The summit focused on three topics: Climate Justice, LGBTQ Justice and Racial Justice.

Rev Joan MontagnesAfter a worship service by the host minister, the Reverend Joan Montagnes, the facilitators for each of the justice topics gave a short TED-style talk about their topic. The participants then participated in separate topic-specific breakout sessions and created cluster-based action plans.

The LGBTQ Justice group, facilitated by East Aurora UU church member Lisa Peterangelo, plans to create a cluster-wide Interweave chapter and use that group for programming and advocacy. Immediately, they are planning to coordinate participation in Buffalo’s Pride event and to encourage people to travel to Albany on May 17 for the LGBTQ Advocacy Day. http://tinyurl.com/May17LGBTQ

The Racial Justice group, facilitated by the Rev. Renee Ruchotzke, plans to have the UU Church of Amherst host an in-person “Intercultural Skills for a Diverse World” cluster-wide training in the Fall of 2016 and then the UU Church of Buffalo plans to host a Beloved Conversations training in the Spring of 2017. A few of the participants plan to take the online Organizing on the Side of Love UU Leadership Institute course http://www.uuinstitute.org/ being offered this summer.

The Climate Justice group, facilitated by the Rev. George Buchanan, focused on the personal part of Climate Justice work:

  1. Getting Unstuck
  2. Learn from and about one another
  3. Commitment to ferocity & determination – both personal and shared

Lisa Peterangelo 20160423_085925

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A Faith Formation Rite of Passage for 4th and 5th Graders

firstlighteditedSince 2004, the Unitarian Universalist Church of Amherst, NY has been offering a special and highly successful program for 4th and 5th graders.  First Light recognizes a first step in the development of a child’s Unitarian Universalist Identity. Each child signs up with an adult mentor—usually a parent—and together they explore in depth each of the Seven Principles, honoring the fact that parents are their children’s primary religious educators. Each month, after completing a packet at home (with fun activities and thought-provoking questions for discussion) in collaboration with their mentor, including the creation of an art project illustrating the principle, the group of students meet with their facilitators to share and discuss further. Thus, they begin to build the foundation for their own UU identity.

P1030782The curriculum was originally developed by UU Amherst members Hella Jacob and Scott Harrigan by adapting and augmenting materials from the out-of-print The UU Kids Book authored by Barbara Marshman, Ann Fields Brotman-Marshfield (now both deceased) and Charlene Brotman. It is being shared under a Creative Commons License.  The class is team-taught by 2 adults, and they charge a small fee ($30) for materials.

The program concludes with special rite of passage ceremony during a Sunday morning service, and the graduates are encouraged to light the chalice in the main sanctuary, in recognition that they now appreciate understand its meaning.  Each child is also presented with a lasting token (a UU medallion or necklace). This program takes place at the age when many children in the Christian faith are making their first communions, so the children often wear fancy clothes to celebrate the occasion.

The congregation is happy to share this program with others. You can download the curriculum from this link, but please read the Creative Commons License first.

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UU Congregation of Buffalo Celebrates Ministerial Installation

Charge to the Minister Joan Montagnes and Karen Matteson on the right photo by Sam Trumbore
Charge to the Minister Joan Montagnes and Karen Matteson on the right photo by Sam Trumbore

Congratulations to the UU Congregation of Buffalo, who installed the Rev. Joan Montagnes on Sunday, November 15, 2015!

The Service was the culmination of a four-year search for a minister who now serves the congregation that has been part of the greater Buffalo community since 1831. Rev. Montagnes is the congregation’s first female settled minister in 184 years. She was unanimously approved by the congregation in June.

Rev. Montagnes, a native of Toronto, has been a Unitarian Universalist minister for 22 years. She has served congregations in Edmonton, Alberta; Beaconsfield, Quebec; Toronto; Wenatchee, Wash.; Moscow, Idaho; and as associate minister at East Shore Unitarian Church, Bellevue, Wash. She was Consultant with the Unitarian Universalist Association for the Western Region in Redmond, Wash., before accepting the position in Buffalo. Her divinity degree is from the Meadville Lombard Theological School of Chicago (1994). She also has a Master of Science degree from the University of Alberta in Edmonton (1990).

The ceremony included opening remarks from Buffalo Mayor Byron Brown and Unitarian Universalist Association members, including those from UUA President Rev. Peter Morales, Rev. Lori Staubitz and Rev. Renee Ruchotzke. It was covered by the local news.

More than three dozen area clergy members from all faiths participated in a ceremonial procession that was part of the Installation Service.

Sarah Lammert Sermon - Photo by Sam Trumbore
Sarah Lammert Sermon – Photo by Sam Trumbore

Rev. Sarah Lammert, the Unitarian Universalist Association Director of Ministries and Faith Development, delivered the Sermon, Hunger and Passion Call Us on Our Way.

The current church, designed by noted architect Edward Austin Kent, and built in 1906, was listed this year on the State Register of Historic Places and on the National Registry of Historic Places. It has gained iconic status in the Elmwood Village because of its old-style English perennial gardens and its American-Gothic architecture. Its Sanctuary has been called “one of the best Arts and Crafts spaces in Buffalo.”

The church has been a community-centered Elmwood-Village institution for decades. Kurt Vonnegut’s “Requiem” had its musical debut at UUCB and was performed by the UUCB Choir. The church also gained historical notoriety when it became a physical and symbolic sanctuary to many pacifists during the Vietnam War.

President Millard Fillmore was a member of the congregation during his life in Buffalo and the congregation welcome Abraham Lincoln as a guest of Fillmore during Lincoln’s procession route before his first inauguration as U.S. President in 1861.

UUCB has formally established itself as a “Welcoming Community” and was one of the first Buffalo churches to marry same-sex couples after the New York State Legislature’s approval of the 2011 Marriage-Equality Act.

The church continues its active social-justice base and community activism by sharing its Sunday collections with a wide variety of Buffalo service institutions and by opening its doors to a diverse range of speakers, meetings, and concert venues. In addition, as part of The Family Promise program, the church offers refuge to many homeless families throughout the year.

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Bold Directions in Structured Youth Programming

First Unitarian in Rochester NY has made some really exciting changes in how their youth program is structured. While they have a large youth program, the philosophy of these changes is accessible to youth programs of every size. Here’s an over view from Sheila Schuh, DRE:

Based on the suggestions in Sustainable Youth Ministry, we have changed the structure of our Youth Group in significant ways-

1. Movement from a Youth Director to a Youth Coordinator/Youth Advisor Specialist Team. This model takes all the responsibility and channel of support from one director and creates a network of adults for youth to connect and work with. Youth Advisors have particular program areas they provide support for (Social Justice, Spirituality, Education, etc) We have also let go of the idea of having a highly charismatic youth director to having a coordinator who is grounded in UU values with a highly collaborative style, working with a team of passionate youth and adults to sustain membership.

2. Movement from limited calendar planning with no defined aims to advanced calendar planning with defined UU balanced programming area objectives. Youth organize the calendar based on these areas: Social Justice, Education, Community Connections/Fuun, Spirituality. They have had 2 major brainstorming and slotting days this year and simply select and slot their priority ideas. Leadership and connection with intergenerational community life is built into the framework.

3. Movement from an all-youth and ad-hoc subgroups leadership model to a Child Adult Leadership Forum (leadership team, all with defined roles) which includes youth in double ratio to advisors and staff. The CALF team meets separately to handle everything from firming up the calendar to making policy decisions and trouble-shooting changes needed to best serve the group. Roles include Youth Moderator, Junior Moderator, Education, Social Justice, Community Connections/Fuun, Food Coordinator, Secretary, etc. This model supports collaboration between a youth leader and advisor specialist to help make a session’s program event happen.

4. Movement from a system in which adults hold youth accountable for violations of covenant and guidelines, to a collaborative restorative circles model. Issues are brought to the Youth Coordinator and DRE, and a team of peers selected by the youth involved go through a multi-step circle process to resolve the conflict.

5. Movement from a splintered communication system to a weekly parent newsletter, active facebook page, and pre-con mandatory meetings.

Youth continue to affirm the model and have the leadership structure in place to make organic changes as needed. They are currently revising roles needed and their definitions for the upcoming year. We are also considering how to build skills needed in leadership earlier in the RE program.

Sheila Schuh, DRE
First Unitarian Church of Rochester, NY
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Big Change for a Small Congregation

I have had the privilege of being the Director of Religious Education at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Amherst for 4 years now. As any veteran DRE knows, change is something that often needs to be approached delicately, and in small increments. For at least my first 2 years, consistency and a non-anxious presence were my main goals. With that said, I have been slowly moving toward a more cooperative and inclusive feel for our Religious education programming, and feeling the urge to pull the youth group in tighter while still allowing them the independence they so need at this age and stage of development.syg 2014

For the first time since I have been at the helm of the program I decided to implement a tapestry of faith curriculum for our Senior Youth group. In previous years, the youth would attend a retreat in the late summer and loosely establish their own curriculum for the year. This year the overlying theme for our religious education program is UU Identity, and so I chose for them the curriculum titled “A Place of Wholeness”. This seemed fitting as we are also running our Coming of Age program this year, and most of the youth are also attending that.

I expected some eye rolling and push back from the youth, as they were accustomed to a more unstructured class time. I was very pleasantly surprised to find they love it! They have enriching discussions, and some have even taken on the responsibility of co-leading workshops with their advisers. They still have their social time at occasional overnights.

I have every intention of continuing with a TOF youth curriculum next year. This experience has shown me that often the youth are more open and flexible than I might anticipate, and that balancing structure with freedom can be a key element in a successful youth group.

 

In Faith & Service,

Victoria Crago

DRE

UUCA

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And More Congregational Social Justice

We are still running stories of congregational social justice projects because we received so many great stories!

North Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Lewis Center, OH

The NUUC Social Action Committee (SAC) has been involved in numerous projects during 2014 to raise awareness, encourage participation in social justice, and provide assistance to address human needs.  Our congregation participated in UUSC’s Guest at Your Table program, hosted an Empty Bowls luncheon to raise money for the Mid-Ohio Foodbank, collected school supplies to benefit students served by the Delaware County Juvenile Probation Department, and collected gifts and donations to support Montana de Luz, a faith based organization in rural Honduras that provides a home for children affected by HIV/AIDS.  Each month we donate our Loose Change Offering to an organization that provides educational awareness or support services to those impacted by social injustice.  Our monthly Fair Trade sales of coffee and chocolate support fair wages for farmers and the proceeds from sales are used to sponsor a child at Montana de Luz.

During 2015 the Social Action Committee offered several educational programs on different social justice topics to provide information to members of our congregation and the surrounding community.  Our environmental group watched “The Story of Solutions” discussed steps we can take to move toward a more sustainable future.  We showed A “Place at the Table”, a documentary about hunger in America.  We hosted a screening and discussion of  “Disruption! “. We sent ribbons for the Climate Ribbon Project with two members to  the People’s Climate March in New York City.  We also showed “Dollarocracy – The Influence of Money on Our Democracy and What We Can Do About It.”

Unitarian Universalist Church of Amherst, New York

In October, our committee  offered a book reading  called an ” Innocent Man” by John Grisham about a innocent man with mental health isues, convicted of a crime and all the inequities in our legal, prison and mental health systems. Then we had a storyteller from Prisoners are People too and had a special collection for them.

Our Committee also provides a meal and chaperones for a homeless family by partnering with the UU Church of Buffalo through Family Promise.  The Buffalo Church hosts familes for a week four times a year and our church assists with one evening meal and sleep over for the family or families.

We hosted a potluck for a UU minister Rev Mark Kiyimba from Uganda, He presented a documentary from Uganda regarding the abusive treatment of LGBT in his country.  His church runs and orphanage for children whose parents died of AIDS and we collected money for his work.

The UU Church of Amherst belongs to VOICE – Buffalo, an organization of faith groups, teacher’s union, many other groups that want to improve the public life in Buffalo, NY.  On Nov 6 VOICE had a public meeting and our church was represented with many other churches and groups. At that meeting we invite politicians, and those in power, along with the community and asked for their support publically on issues to improve our life here in Buffalo. This year our focus was on restorative justice,, improving the mental health in Erie County and the County Jail, We also wanted to reinstitute the local conditional release program for non-violent prisoners. At the meeting the public officials announced their support in front of about 700 people.

West Shore Unitarian Universalist Church in Rocky River, Ohio

This year the Social Action Committee decided to honor long time member and one of the founders of the SAC, Jane Metzger, by renovating and expanding the food pantry at West Shore.  The pantry is open every Sunday morning as well as during the week.  We have two major food drives, one in October and one in February, and use the food collected to restock the pantry and also to share with Urban Hope a UU based drop in center for the homeless, and St. Paul’s church where low income and homeless people can go for assistance.

In  April we celebrated the 5th anniversary of the social action film series.  We have shown films about PTSD, sustainability and climate change, human trafficking, economic inequality, drones, women’s rights, marriage equality, and genetically altered food.  There is a regular group of attendees but we have partnered with task forces at West Shore as well as other community groups to increase the viewing audience.

We participated in Homeless Stand Down and for the third year we collected shoes to be distributed by Walk A Mile In My Shoes.  We also collected school supplies for Case School, where 10 members of West Shore regularly volunteer.  Several of our members participated in raising awareness of mass incarceration issues and hope to focus on this issue in the coming year.

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More Congregational Social Justice

Image courtesy of John Kasawa at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of John Kasawa at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

This month we are continuing to run social justice stories we received from congregations.

 

Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Greater Canton, Ohio

Every Sunday at 1:00, people who are hungry for a meal assemble on the lawn west of Market Street between 3rd and 4th Streets, where various churches and other organizations set up tables to distribute food and sometimes clothing to any who have gathered there.

The UCC church faithfully sets up tables and hands out a variety of hot foods every Sunday. Other groups, like ours, contribute less often. Every month there are familiar faces and new faces waiting in line.

 

On the Sunday before Christmas, we came to Kresge Square with homemade cookies and hats, gloves and scarves donated by UUCGC members and friends. There were so many cold winter accessories that we needed two tables to stack them on. It was gray, cold, and muddy. The people who came by the tables looked grimly through the hats and gloves, nodding with satisfaction when they found something that could fit them. “My little girl needs a new pair of gloves. She just keeps growing,” one man told me as he picked up a small pair of pink fleece gloves. Picking out the right pair of gloves, the hat that would fit, or a warm scarf was serious business. But when we pointed to our other table across the lawn, the table that displayed plates of homemade cookies, faces brightened. Two men pretended to steal an entire plate of cookies but returned laughing when the teens called after them. Another guy flirted with my 71-year-old mother, complimenting her on her Christmas tree earrings and asking her for a date. I like to talk smack about the Browns this time of year since so many people show up in Browns and Steelers gear.

 

On another Sunday, the weekend before Thanksgiving this year, Max and I put about 100 sandwiches and 20 juice boxes into a large plastic tub and carried it between us to the long line that snaked across the lawn as people waited for the UCC volunteers to set up their tables. It was a cold day, and we were all shivering. Those without gloves were holding them under their armpits, stomping their feet to keep them warm. The mood was more than usually pleasant, though, no doubt helped by a band of four musicians who had braved the cold temperatures and set up near a picnic table where they played guitars, violin, and a horn. The atmosphere was festive, and our sandwiches were welcomed. Our juice boxes, as always, disappeared within seconds. As Max once said to a visiting youth who wondered whether anyone really appreciates our tuna fish and egg sandwiches, “We don’t do it because we want their gratitude, we do it because they’re hungry.” But there was not one person who accepted a sandwich from us who didn’t thank us sincerely and bless us for coming down.

 

No moment during my own Thanksgiving celebration later that week made me feel as grateful, happy, and blessed as I felt to walk somewhat shyly among strangers and offer them food made by the children of our congregation.

—by Erin Dubois

 

First Universalist Church of Rochester, New York

Members and friends of the First Universalist Church of Rochester, NY, recently contributed nearly $500 to Interfaith Impact of New York State through a pass the plate for justice emphasis during a Sunday morning service. Interfaith Impact is a state-wide advocacy network composed of Unitarian Universalists, Reform Jews and progressive Protestants who advocate on state-wide issues. The particular focus of the contribution was on stopping hydrofracking in New York State.

 

Unitarian Universalist Society of Cleveland

Newly called minister Rev. Joe Cherry has brought a different way of giving to the community. In an acknowledgement that the minister’s ministry is never solely to the members and friends of the church, nor contained to the walls, Joe has asked his congregation to tithe some of his ministerial time. Through a lottery selection of organizations suggested by members, he is giving around four hours a week to organizations outside the church.

 

North Unitarian Universalist Congregation in Lewis Center, Ohio

The NUUC Social Action Committee (SAC) has been involved in numerous projects during 2014 to raise awareness, encourage participation in social justice, and provide assistance to address human needs.  Our congregation participated in UUSC’s Guest at Your Table program, hosted an Empty Bowls luncheon to raise money for the Mid-Ohio Foodbank, collected school supplies to benefit students served by the Delaware County Juvenile Probation Department, and collected gifts and donations to support Montana de Luz, a faith based organization in rural Honduras that provides a home for children affected by HIV/AIDS.  Each month we donate our Loose Change Offering to an organization that provides educational awareness or support services to those impacted by social injustice.  Our monthly Fair Trade sales of coffee and chocolate support fair wages for farmers and the proceeds from sales are used to sponsor a child at Montana de Luz.

 

During 2015 the Social Action Committee offered several educational programs on different social justice topics to provide information to members of our congregation and the surrounding community.  Our environmental group watched “The Story of Solutions” discussed steps we can take to move toward a more sustainable future.  We showed A “Place at the Table”, a documentary about hunger in America.  We hosted a screening and discussion of  “Disruption! “. We sent ribbons for the Climate Ribbon Project with two members to  the People’s Climate March in New York City.  We also showed “Dollarocracy – The Influence of Money on Our Democracy and What We Can Do About It.”

 

 

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